Do you have an unsafe driving remediation plan?

Motor Carriers Guide to ImprovingUnsafe driving includes risky behavior such as speeding, improper lane change, aggressive driving, and other types of  dangerous activity.

Recently, a motor carrier was placed out of service due to a range of reasons (Click Here for Article), but one of those reasons that caught my eye was “Widespread instances of drivers operating commercial passenger vehicles at speeds in excess of posted speed limits.

This made me wonder how the auditors arrived at this conclusion.

  • Toll receipt auditing?
  • GPS records review through “e-discovery”?
  • EOBR records or driver logs that showed getting from point “A” to point “B” in far less time than would be considered reasonable?

Unsafe CSA sheetRegardless of the mechanism to arrive at this conclusion, the immediate defense by the carrier should be to explain how they monitor and “control” drivers to avoid unsafe behavior or risk taking while behind the wheel.  Additionally, if those controls are deemed inadequate by the auditor, the fleet should be ready to prepare a remediation plan to curb the aggressive driving and keep it under control going forward.

If you use GPS or other systems that capture unsafe driving events (i.e. camera recorders, etc.) how do you measure performance violation rates?

  • What’s an acceptable level of speeding, hard braking, rough cornering, number of recordings per week per driver, etc?
  • How do you benchmark that against other operators to see if you’re above or below the norm for your type of operation?
  • Is your rate going up or down?
  • Do you have a plan to coach or re-train drivers when they exceed thresholds?
  • Is that documented and is it followed (how would you prove that it’s followed?)
  • Does your vendor help you solve these issues with reporting from their system and bench-marking against other clients?

At SafetyFirst we help our clients understand the metrics of our unsafe driver identification and coaching-remediation program.  We provide:

  1. live, statistically relevant bench-marking by SIC code,
  2. training for BOTH the supervisor and the driver (one on how to coach/counsel and the other on the consequences of risk taking while behind the wheel)
  3. The industry’s ONLY driver training program for excessive speed (GPS alerts)
  4. “paper trails and/or electronic confirmation” of activity in case of audits, and
  5. these capabilities for about 1/100th of the cost of the GPS or camera systems.

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Resources

smc 1The Safety Management Cycle (SMC) for the Unsafe Driving Behavior Analysis and Safety Improvement Category (BASIC) helps carriers (and drivers!) evaluate existing processes over six areas including:

  1. Policies and Procedures
  2. Roles and Responsibilities, 
  3. Qualification and Hiring,
  4. Training and Communication, 
  5. Monitoring and Tracking, and
  6. Meaningful Action

By reviewing each of these areas, a fleet operator has the chance to spot gaps in management practices, shore up communications plans with drivers and test to make sure that policies are being followed and enforced.

We recommend you investigate these FREE resources from FMCSA for developing a plan to address unsafe driving before an audit team considers your operation for review:

Much of safety work is mundane and un-glamorous, but when executed consistently, can be highly effective at minimizing injuries, fines and violations.  Similarly, it can help bolster up-time, productivity and profitability.

Safer driving starts with a safety-aware, safety-vigilant driver, and this comes from managers who will compassionately intervene when performance issues arise.  Coaching shows concern when it’s focused as a “conversation about safety” instead of a head-butting “confrontation about blame/fault“.  At least that’s our opinion – how about you?

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UPDATE: Drowsy Driving

Our recent posting about Drowsy Driving got a lot of attention.  We wanted to circle back and provide a few updates.

A federal jury awarded a $7 million judgment in the case of a fatigue (or driving while drowsy) case.  Here’s a link to the report:  http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/southcentral/2011/11/14/223977.htm

Several interesting news articles have appeared over the last week or two and we wanted to share them with you.

November 17, 2011  http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/494110 (it starts with “For any motorist, driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs or without sufficient sleep can have disastrous results. However, drowsy or intoxicated truckers and other drivers of large commercial vehicles pose a unique safety threat, as serious consequences of accidents caused by these types of vehicles are far more likely to gravely impact passengers in other autos: only about ten percent of those killed annually in truck accidents are drivers or passengers in the truck.”)

November 9, 2011 — “Driving drowsy as dangerous as driving drunk, studies showhttp://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2011/11/09/driving-drowsy-as-dangerous-as-driving-drunk-studies-show/  “I know what it feels like and looks like and so do you. So why do many surveys show that most of us have driven while drowsy and many of us do so on a regular basis? Well, for one thing, we are not a culture that takes sleep seriously.”

November 15, 2011 – “Not Enough Drivers Realize Dangers of Drowsy Driving, Insurer Says”  http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/east/2011/11/15/224095.htm “According to the National Sleep Foundation, the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety estimates that about one in six deadly crashes involve a drowsy driver.”

November 14, 2011 – “Is the driver in the next lane falling asleep at the wheel?”  http://fredericksburg.com/News/FLS/2011/112011/11142011/664324 – “BE CAREFUL next time you’re out on the road–the driver next to you might be asleep. Or at least pretty tired. Neither, obviously, is a good thing.”

Our “Ten-Minute Training Topic” on Drowsy Driving has been one of the most popular and often downloaded topic we’ve published since 2003!  Thanks for the interest and support of our crash reduction programs.